About

its never too late to mend

 

Rayna Fahey

radical crafter, organiser, mother, activist, gardener, writer and lover

+ Founder of radicalcrossstitch.com

+ Co-founder Melbourne Craft Cartel and producer of the Craft Cartel Podcast

+ Co-founder Melbourne Revolutionary Craft Circle

 

Exhibitions:

+ Compassionate Voices – Koskela, Sydney, 2014

+ Natural Industry (curator) – Incinerator Gallery, Melbourne, 2013

+ Riot Here, Riot Now – W3 Gallery, London 2013

+ It is what it is – beyond the debate – Hawkesbury Regional Gallery, Windsor, 2013

+ It’s Never Too Late to Mend – Solo show – Incinerator Gallery, Melbourne, 2012

+ Practice Makes Perfect – Yarra Ranges Regional Museum, 2012

+ I Say Doilies, You Say Doyleys – Gleaners Inc, Melbourne, 2012

+ WE are Wyndham Vale – Iramoo Community Centre, Melbourne, permanent, 2011

+ A Touch of Class – Somedays Gallery, Sydney, 2011

+ We Craft This City – Object Gallery, Sydney, 2010

+ Sculpture Now!?! – Yarra Sculpture Gallery, Melbourne, 2010

+ Interventionist Guide to Melbourne – Platform Gallery and around the streets of Melbourne, 2009

+ Craftwerk 2.0: New Household Tactics for the Popular Crafts – Jönköpings läns Museum, Sweden, 2009–2010

+ Totem – Federation Square Atrium Melbourne, 2008

+ Extreme Craft – Lithuania Centre for Contemporary Art, 2007

 

Installations:

+ Jesus Was A Refugee – guerilla mosaic – Melbourne 2013

+ Finally! – vacant land cross stitch – Melbourne 2012

+ What Else Could Go Here? - vacant land fence weaving series – Melbourne 2012

+ QRacks in the Land – Streets of Melbourne Festival – Melbourne 2009

+ Sorry Fence – Section 8 Container Bar – Melbourne 2008

+ I Want To Live Here vacant land fence cross stitch – Melbourne 2008/07, Newcastle 2007

 

Film:

+ Real Estate 4 Ransom (2011) documentary, Prosper Australia and Foreground Media

+ Making it Handmade (2010) full length feature documentary, Directed by Anna Brownfield, Poison Apple Productions. DVD release, Melbourne International Film Festival

+ I Wanna Live Here (2008) short film, Directed by Anna Brownfield

 

Public Talks/workshops:

+ The Fabric of Resistance – The history of radical, political craft – Melbourne 2013 (RMIT), 2010 (Street Workshops), 2009 (Melbourne Social Forum)

+ Resistance is Fertile – Embroidered guerilla garden workshop – Melbourne 2012

+ POP! goes the weaver, weaving/street art workshop at Show Us Your Arts Festival -Melbourne 2011

+ Saucy Fun! Community Apple Sauce making/print making workshop – Melbourne 2011

+ CounterPoint, panel discussion co-presented with Casey Jenkins, State of Design Festival - Melbourne, 2010

+ Embroidery Porn, Trashbag Rehab Craft Cartel workshop – Melbourne, 2009

+ Handmade Revolution – Wellington and Hamilton, Aotearoa New Zealand 2009

+ Political Craft across cultures – Saravango Community, Port Vila, Vanuatu 2008

+ The Revolution is Handmade with Dr Joyce Stalker – Melbourne 2008

+ Craft and Storytelling with Zoe Thompson-Moore – TiNA Festival, Newcastle 2007

 

Publications:

+ Craftivism: The Art and Craft of Activism by Betsy Greer – contributor (2014)

+ How to Make Trouble and Influence People by Iain McIntyre (1st ed 2009 2nd ed 2013) - featured artist

+ Street Knowledge: An encyclopedia of street culture by King Adz – featured artist

+ Knitting for Good: A guide to Creating Personal, Social and Political Change Stitch by Stitch by Betsy Greer – Sidebar contributor

+ 3CR Community Radio 2010 Seeds of Dissent Calendar – contributing artist

+ Regretsy: Where DiY meets WTF by April Winchell – contributor

 

My craft seeks to challenge the social and political assumptions within craft practice. I aim to break down the capitalist and consumerist dominant paradigm within the contemporary craft movement. My craft also seeks to challenge similar assumptions within activist communities. My craft seeks to break down the dominant macho rigid and violent underpinnings of anti-capitalist/colonialist/war movements. My craft draws on a long history of women-lead creative resistance.

 

Image: ‘It’s Never Too Late to Mend’ photo by Mark Burban